The potential impacts of climate change on the biodiversity of Norfolk

TitleThe potential impacts of climate change on the biodiversity of Norfolk
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsPrice, J
JournalTrans. Norfolk Norwich Nat. Soc
Volume50
Issue1
Start Page1-8
Abstract

Climate change is posing, and will continue to pose, increasing risks to biodiversity.  This paper reviews the projected climate change impacts (relative to a 1961-1990 baseline) on some of the biodiversity in Norfolk (including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, butterflies, common macro moths, dragonflies, bumblebees, grasshoppers, shieldbugs, ferns, orchids, and some trees and shrubs.  Of the 834 species examined, the taxa potentially most at risk to loss of climate suitability with 2°C of warming are the Grasshoppers and Bush Crickets (75% of the species), Bumblebees (72%) and common Macro Moths (68%).  By 3.2°C this goes to 88% of the Grasshoppers and Bush Crickets, 84% of the common macro moths, 83% of the shieldbugs and 78% of the butterflies.  While animals fare better climatically, they are still likely to be impacted by the projected losses of some of their food resources and the loss of bumblebees could have a major impact on pollination.

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