Reports

Tidal stream energy in the UK: Stakeholder perceptions study

This report presents the views of a range of stakeholders from the tidal stream energy sector on the barriers and opportunities that the sector faces and which organisations have the responsibility and ability to act on these. Approximately 20 individuals from a range of organisations were interviewed including: trade associations, academic research projects, testing facilities, regional and national government, utilities, funding bodies, regulators, and technology developers. The report identifies areas of consensus and disagreement within the industry.

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Argentinean soy based biodiesel: an introduction to production and impacts

This working paper explores the economic, social and environmental context, drivers and impacts of increased demand for Argentine soy-based biodiesel. It is based on extensive stakeholder interviews in Argentina, including those in government, academia and the third sector; participant observation with communities in soy cultivation areas; and review of relevant academic and grey literature.  

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Transition to sustainable development in the UK housing sector: from case study to model implementation

There is evidence that the housing and community sector in the UK is unsustainable, in CO2 emissions, overuse of land and other resources, social and economic indicators such as a lack of good quality housing, and institutional problems of a conservative building system and a planning and regulatory system that is slow to respond to changing needs and demands.

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Has US Shale Gas Reduced CO2 Emissions?

Since 2007, the production of shale gas in large volumes has substantially reduced the wholesale price of natural gas in the US. This report examines the emissions savings in the US power sector, influenced by shale gas, and the concurrent trends in coal exports that may increase emissions in Europe and Asia.

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Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries: Revisiting the assumptions

This paper provides a critical perspective to the debate on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

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The Visible Energy Trial: Insights from Qualitative Interviews

In December 2009, the UK Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) announced its intention to roll-out ‘smart meters’, accompanied by free standing real-time displays, to all UK householders by 2020. As well as paving the way to a ‘smarter’ grid able to handle large amounts of micro-generation and improved demand management, this decision is justified by the assertion that: “These meters will provide consumers with real time information on their electricity use to help them control consumption, save money and reduce emissions” (DECC, 2009, 71).

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Critical Stakeholder Perceptions of Carbon and Sustainability Reporting in the UK Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation

This working paper describes investigation of selected stakeholder opinion of UK biofuel and related bioenergy policy over the period September 2006 to December 2009. A fuller report will be available here: http://www.supergen-bioenergy.net/?_id=339 and a more condensed journal paper will follow. A review of the sustainability issues associated with some 19 feedstocks (Thornley et al., 2008) is also available at the above website.

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Assessing common(s) arguments for an equal per capita allocation

Emissions rights are commodities and many hold that these commodities (or alternatively the revenue from their auction) should be allocated to (adult) individuals on an equal per capita basis. Proponents of this equal per capita allocation (EPCA) often argue for it on the grounds that the atmosphere or greenhouse gas emissions sinks are a “commons”.

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Governing Climate Change Post-2012: The Role of Global Cities - Melbourne

While international negotiations for a climate change policy framework post-2012 continue, there is increasing recognition that a range of activities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are taking place ‘beyond’ this formal arena. This working paper contributes to the research of the Tyndall Centre programme 1 by focusing on a group of non nation-state actors - global cities – and their role in climate governance.

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Personal Carbon Trading: a critical examination of proposals for the UK

To effectively mitigate climate change in the long-term, capping carbon dioxide emissions at the individual level has been proposed. Known as personal carbon allowances, these would be decreased year-on-year. Trading in personal carbon allowances would be encouraged, as a means to effectively and equitably reduce emissions overall. This conceptual paper aims to critically examine personal carbon trading (PCT) by questioning the assumptions underlying this proposal and identifying the gaps in current thinking.

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Transitions for the People: Theory and Practice of ‘Transition’ and ‘Resilience’ in the UK’s Transition Movement

This paper presents an exploratory case study of a new community-led sustainability initiative in the UK called the Transition movement. In recent months Transition movement groups have appeared in a significant number of UK towns with the stated aim of responding to the question: “how can our community respond to the challenges, and opportunities, of Peak Oil and Climate Change?” [Transition Network 2008].

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Does Geography Matter for the Clean Development Mechanism?

Under the Kyoto Protocol, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is designed to serve the dual purposes of allowing the industrialised countries to earn credits by investing in project activities that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, while contributing to sustainable development in developing countries via the flows of technology and capital. The fact that the geographic distribution of CDM projects is highly uneven motivates this research into whether certain geographic endowments matter for the CDM development.

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The Clean Development Mechanism and Sustainable Development: A Panel Data Analysis

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol is designed to allow the industrialised countries to earn credits by investing in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction projects in developing countries, which contribute to sustainable development in the host countries. This research empirically investigates the long-run impacts of CDM projects on CO2 emissions for 34 CDM host countries over 1990-2007.

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A Dynamic Typology of Stakeholder Engagement within Climate Change Research

This paper offers a descriptive overview of Stakeholder Engagement (ShE) within climate change research at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research.

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World economic dynamics and technological change: projecting interactions between economic output and CO2 emissions

With the emergence of accelerated technological change and progress, economic growth has been exhibiting increasingly complex features. Trade within and across industries, countries and regions, has risen sharply, and the globalisation effects of economies of specialisation, low-cost information technologies and networks have taken a stronger grip on economies.

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Carbon Capability: what does it mean, how prevalent is it, and how can we promote it?

This Working Paper introduces the concept of ‘carbon capability’, provides initial empirical evidence of levels of carbon capability amongst the UK public, and suggests ways in which carbon capability might be promoted. ‘Carbon capability’ captures the contextual meanings associated with carbon, whilst also referring to an individual’s ability and motivation to reduce emissions within the broader institutional and social context.

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Governing Climate Change Post-2012: The Role of Global Cities - London

While international negotiations for a climate change policy framework post-2012 continue, there is increasing recognition that a range of activities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are taking place ‘beyond’ this formal arena. This working paper contributes to the research of the Tyndall Centre programme 1 by focusing on a group of non nation-state actors - global cities – and their role in climate governance.

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Allocating emissions rights: Are equal shares, fair shares?

In a world where greenhouse gas emissions must be reduced, what is the fair way to allocate rights to the limited available emissions? For many, the answer is that a fair allocation is an equal per capita allocation. From at least as far back as 1988, it has been proposed that emissions rights be allocated between nations on an equal per capita basis.

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The Economics of Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change

The problem of avoiding dangerous climate change requires analysis from many disciplines. Mainstream economic thinking about the problem has shifted with the Stern Review from a single-discipline focus on cost-benefit analysis to a new inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary risk analysis, already evident in the IPCC Third Assessment Report. I argue that this shift is more evidence of the failure of the traditional, equilibrium approach in general to provide an adequate understanding of observed behaviour, either at the micro or macro scale.

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An Integrated Assessment of the Potential for Change in Storm Activity over Europe: Implications for Insurance and Forestry in the UK

In western Europe, two severe windstorms at the start of 1990 caused insured losses of around £6.5 billion and 160 deaths. At the end of 1999 storms destroyed 10% of French forests. The objective of this Tyndall Centre Theme 3 research is to assess the implications of future European windstorm activity for the forestry and insurance industries in the UK.

Hanson, C., T. Holt, and J. Palutikof

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A blueprint for integrated assessment of climate change

The Blueprint Project was set up to reach key decisions on how the Tyndall Centre will develop its plans for integrated assessment modelling over the years 2002 to 2005. The Blueprint Project now forms the first stage of the work carried out under the theme 1 flagship project on Integrating Frameworks. As a result of the work carried out under this project, the plans for integrated assessment modelling work have now been laid out and are under way. 

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How do regulated and voluntary carbon-offset schemes compare?

The purchase of Verified Emission Reductions through the voluntary carbon market has become a mainstream practice across business and individuals who aim to offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This voluntary market relies on offset projects which may or may not follow the standards of the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism.

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Governing Climate Change Post-2012: The Role of Global Cities, Case-Study: Los Angeles

In May 2007 Los Angeles adopted an Action Plan to Lead the Nation In Fighting Global Warming. The plan includes a CO2 emissions reduction target of 35 percent by 2030 of 1990 levels. The approach Los Angeles is taking is one of simultaneously addressing future energy and water security by investing in decentralised renewable energy and decreasing per-capita water use. Additional areas include waste management, greening of buildings and open space and addressing emissions from the transport sector. The emphasis has so far been on the supply, rather than the demand, side.

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